WHAT CAN I SAY?

January 10 – March 3, 2018

301 Gallery
301 Cabot Street
Beverly, MA 01915

“What Can I Say?” brings together a group of artists whose work employs language as a tool for provocation and resistance. Drawing on personal experience, history, and current events, these artists respond poignantly to the salient issues of our time using humor, irony, and provocation. Through photography, painting, drawing, fiber art, sculpture, book arts, and performance, “What Can I Say?” collectively addresses national and social identities, the law, capitalism and greed, the news media, and more, illustrating how art can be used as an effective tool for change and resistance.

Artists: Ryan Arthurs, Taylor Clough, Johan Deckmann, Pat Falco,  Andy Li,  Daisy Parris, John Richey, Joanna Tam, Alok Vaid-Menon

Review: ‘What Can I Say?’ Small group show at Montserrat gives artists the chance to answer, by Keith Powers


STUDENT PERFORMANCE SERIES

77777 copy.jpg

This two week-long series will transform Frame 301 gallery into a dynamic, street-front performance space. Two works will be selected by the gallery staff, each of which will be performed in the window gallery during a one-week period, with the remnants of the performance remaining on display for the duration of that week.

November 27–December 8, 2017

Frame 301 Gallery
301 Cabot Street
Beverly, MA 01915

Max Reinhard will perform Insulate on Tuesday, November 28, 2017, from 3:30-7pm.

Max Reinhard will walk the line between comfort and claustrophobia in the form of a sculptural performance. By weaving himself into a cocoon over the course of several hours, he will progressively obscure himself from view. His process will be displayed on a screen from a webcam inside the capsule, allowing the onlooker a first person perspective into this confined space. Max is interested in repetitive tasks bringing comfort and security, but also discomfort as we become trapped in habits, patterns, and obsessions.

Róisín Gilligan will perform Stranger Beings on Wednesday, December 6, 2017, from 6–6:30pm.

Stranger Beings is a performance piece in a series of ongoing works by artist Róisín Gilligan. The works explore the relationships and interactions we have with one another as individual beings– whether between strangers, close friends, or lovers–Róisín examines the ways we interact with one another and how those interactions create the environment around us, as well as the ways in which our physical being and the connection we have with one another limits our intimacy.


MI JU: WOORI 우리

October 23 – December 11, 2017

Carol Schlosberg Alumni Gallery
23 Essex Street
Beverly, MA 01915

New York artist Mi Ju creates meticulous works on canvas that showcase birds, insects, fruit, and plantlife rendered in collage, acrylic paint, watercolor, pen, and pencil. Her large, labor-intensive and layered works toy with the micro and macro and explore such themes as pollution, global warming, food chains, and extreme weather conditions. Tiny ecosystems accumulate over large surfaces, creating intricate universes composed of marks and color.


MATT MURPHY: FREEDOM OF ASSEMBLY

August 7–September 9, 2017

Carol Schlosberg Alumni Gallery
23 Essex Street
Beverly, MA 01915

This exhibition presents a single painting made from 20 shaped canvases on a single wall, along with one of several process drawings that informed the painting.  The painting was created in response to the specific proportion of the wall: 335 inches by 114 inches.  

The work draws kinesthetic relationships between shapes and the space they inhabit. The intention of the painting is to evoke liminal states, waking states, and fantasies. The shapes in these paintings are under the influence of each other, changing the nature of the space between them. If the shapes move or change color, the whole gesture changes. I see these relationships as mathematical or musical. Color in is not referential; it straddles the real and imaginary. Color is material and exists in this world but seeks to expose a world of fantasy.


JAMEY HART: WHAT'S NOW FROM THEN

July 21–September 6, 2017

Frame 301 Gallery
301 Cabot Street
Beverly, MA 01915

Jamey Hart collects discarded material such as shoes, gloves, plastics, rope, and string, which he uses to create humorous works that comment on our accumulation of stuff and that bridge the mediums of painting and sculpture. What’s Now From Then includes five recent paintings and an excerpt from Hart’s book ON PAINTING, a collection of writing from the past two years that sheds light on the language we attach to art and to the process of making.

Jamey writes:
I am invested in the gestation of an object. The way a thing comes into being, like a rock or a snowball, compacted and varied. Shaped and affected by the strange attractions of the world itself. I wonder what it means to carry on making objects, and how to make the next one.

I grab at painting and try to form a thing that is as dense as a black hole while attempting to cull some poetic out of a rag or a stick. At the base level, the work is about material, more specifically the material language of painting and the potential therein. I am informed by things that grow from themselves, where the meaning is found radiating off of them in some gaseous, amorphous fog, formless but there. I try to lasso some of the energy that exists while I am making, some contained power, and keep it there. After good days, I am left with the object in the room with me, haunting and inconsolable, making me want to keep going.

The Frame 301 space is presented to the public through expansive storefront windows that face the road, and encourages large-scale, site-specific works from emerging and established artists. The unique venue encourages installations that encompass the entirety of the space and completely transform it. The public is able to view and appreciate the artwork on a 24/7 basis, leading many to unexpectedly experience the artwork.


TIM MCCOOL: MOST IMPROVED

July 10–July 29, 2017

Montserrat Gallery
23 Essex Street
Beverly, MA 01915

Most Improved, a solo exhibition by Boston-based artist Tim McCool features a variety of paintings and sculptures that will be displayed alongside three workshop spaces. Workshops will be held each week in the gallery space. McCool is a painter, drawer and installation artist. Originally from Pittsburgh, McCool moved to Boston to pursue an undergraduate degree at Boston College. He received his Master’s in Fine Arts from Tufts University and the School of the Museum of Fine Arts. McCool has exhibited his work at the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, Carroll & Sons Gallery, Bentley University, and the Essex Art Center.


BRENDAN MACALLISTER

May 30–July 17, 2017

Frame 301 Gallery
301 Cabot Street
Beverly, MA 01915

My work is rooted in a brutish, naive style and focuses on the absurdity of people and the human condition. Using metaphors, symbols, allusion and colorful figures I create a visual narrative usually meant to disassociate, but also speak personally. I use dark humor to speak on otherwise taboo subjects in a lighthearted way, offering hidden underlying meaning through obscurities and curiosities.

Brendan MacAllister is a recent graduate of Montserrat College of Art and currently lives and works in Beverly, Massachusetts. He has recently exhibited at Montserrat College of Art, Beverly, MA, Porter Mill Gallery, Beverly, MA, Distillery Gallery, Boston, MA, and Nahcotta Gallery, Portsmouth, NH.

The Frame 301 space is presented to the public through expansive storefront windows that face the road, and encourages large-scale, site-specific works from emerging and established artists. The unique venue encourages installations that encompass the entirety of the space and completely transform it. The public is able to view and appreciate the artwork on a 24/7 basis, leading many to unexpectedly experience the artwork.


BCA GALA


FINDERS KEEPERS

April 3–May 12
222 Cabot Gallery
222 Cabot Street
Beverly, MA 01915

Navigating a space between painting and sculpture-- Work that never really seems to truly be either or, but maybe something else entirely.

Aubrey Gauthier collects, cuts and sands found wood as her support. Working her way around each cylindrical object she paints and collages found paper, metal and other material onto the surface. Gauthier chooses to keep the assemblages active, like a puzzle that has different images depending on how you assemble it. The objects are not glued to one another, rather each installation of the objects are interchangeable. Options for displaying the objects are infinite, as you can imagine hundreds of ways to display a single grouping.

Jamey Hart's work is made up of paint, wood, glue, found material and other recognizable objects. Found material is often disguised in paint or wrapped in paint soaked yarn. Whether it be doll parts, clothes, tennis racket, or a cut up soccer ball, the object's history is present in the end result. No shape, surface or edge is the same, and begs to be viewed from every angle. Hart’s work is relatively small, and often highlights one or two found objects rather than a mass of hundreds. Focusing on one or two objects calls attention to their history and the unique surfaces, colors, and shapes associated with them, like a portrait of a discarded object or memory.

Susan Still Scott’s painted objects interact with the corner, wall, floor, and reference (or poke fun at) the traditional assembly of a painting. Her objects often appear to be paintings, but beat up, ripped, stuffed, and sewn back together. They are humorous in the way that they are assembled and displayed. Paintings that sit on the floor, lean, or simply hung lower than normal. They challenge our assumptions of painting and the ways we typically experience art objects.
--
Kevin Lucey


REVOLTING